Bespoke Haggarts Tweed Shooting Plus Two’s & Plus Four’s

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Breeks, plus twos, plus fours, knickerbockers – are they all the same – what is the difference and does it matter?

Knickerbockers
As the name suggests, they come from Europe and the name is not generally recognised here in Great Britain. It is usually a short Breek (just to the knee and no more) and quite tight on the leg – all right for walking in a straight line but not for climbing, bending etc. as there is not enough material and no give.

Breeks
Again a more European word then British – the garment can be more generous in leg width but is again short in length, fastening just below the knee and with no turnover they are more fitting and thus not much use in climbing, hunting etc. they are classed as more a fashion garment.

Plus Twos
Here we have the original British garment which are often confused with Breeks. First of all the length of the leg should finish exactly four inches below the bottom of the knee – when the garment is fastened correctly (just below the knee) a correct plus two should give a two inch fold (two inch down and two inch up). If one is doing a lot of bering an even longer leg length may be required or even wider in the leg, however Plus Twos are widely used in walking, golfing any out door sporting pursuit.

Plus Fours
The old photographs of golfers and sports people generally show this garment which is not quite so popular today as it once was – very baggy and a four inch fold over the knee (remember this would measure eight inches below the bottom of the knee when unfastened). These are generally ordered by people that are purely stalking or requiring a lot of bending and leg movement.

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What are the benefits of Plus Twos/Fours?
Very practical for any outdoor activity golfing, fishing, hunting, hill walking etc. giving, as it does, plenty of freedom to bend the legs – they are also currently extremely fashionable, comfortable and are supplied in a large variety of materials. Another benefits that only the socks (stockings) would get wet or dirty thus ensuring the longevity of the garment. Indeed those that try them out for the first time enthuse about them and wonder why they never tried them before.

Breeks, plus twos, plus fours, knickerbockers - are they all the same - what is the difference and does it matter?  Knickerbockers As the name suggests, they come from Europe and the name is not generally recognised here in Great Britain. It is usually a short Breek (just to the knee and no more) and quite tight on the leg - all right for walking in a straight line but not for climbing, bending etc. as there is not enough material and no give.  Breeks Again a more European word then British - the garment can be more generous in leg width but is again short in length, fastening just below the knee and with no turnover they are more fitting and thus not much use in climbing, hunting etc. they are classed as more a fashion garment.  Plus Twos Here we have the original British garment which are often confused with Breeks. First of all the length of the leg should finish exactly four inches below the bottom of the knee - when the garment is fastened correctly (just below the knee) a correct plus two should give a two inch fold (two inch down and two inch up). If one is doing a lot of bering an even longer leg length may be required or even wider in the leg, however Plus Twos are widely used in walking, golfing any out door sporting pursuit.  Plus Fours The old photographs of golfers and sports people generally show this garment which is not quite so popular today as it once was - very baggy and a four inch fold over the knee (remember this would measure eight inches below the bottom of the knee when unfastened). These are generally ordered by people that are purely stalking or requiring a lot of bending and leg movement.  What are the benefits of Plus Twos/Fours? Very practical for any outdoor activity golfing, fishing, hunting, hill walking etc. giving, as it does, plenty of freedom to bend the legs - they are also currently extremely fashionable, comfortable and are supplied in a large variety of materials. Another benefits that only the socks (stockings) would get wet or dirty thus ensuring the longevity of the garment. Indeed those that try them out for the first time enthuse about them and wonder why they never tried them before.

Since 1801 PJ Haggarts of Aberfeldy & Lovat Mills have been weaving some of the finest tweeds in Scotland suppling many Highland estates including the Royal family. We have a classic range of heavy weight keepers tweeds that can be made into some timeless classic country clothing perfect for that day in the field or on the hill. We also offer a wonderful range of Ettrick tweeds woven in Hawick by Lovat Mills.

From country shooting coats, breeks, plus fours, waistcoats we offer a made to order service. Some of the country classics are displayed below but if you don’t see something that suits your needs, or you need a lighter weight cloth please e-mail us.

For sizing chart please click here

A full range of country Haggart’s & Ettrick 21oz estate tweeds available below.
Shipping worldwide from the Highlands of Scotland.

scottish haggarts tweed argyll kilt jackets and country shooting tweeds copy

 

Click on links below to enlarge and online ordering